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Category: Employment Law

New National Minimum Wage and National Living Wage increases and what you need to do

The national minimum wage applies to anybody that has reached the school leaving age, with the national living wage applying to those aged 25 and over. The current rates along with the new rates are below: Year 25 and over 21 to 24 18 to 20 Under 18 Apprentice April 2019 (current rate) £8.21 £7.70 £6.15 £4.35 ...

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IR35 – the new regime

What is it? IR35 are tax rules which to try and prevent workers/contractors who claim to be self-employed benefitting from better rates in relation to income tax and national insurance. In essence HMRC are targeting those individuals, who but for the intermediary (usually a company) through which they offer their services being in pla...

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Employment law, is it such a headache?

Whether you are a first-time employer or an established business with several employees, trying to keep up with the requirements of employment law can be at times feel like walking through a minefield. Below are some simple steps to take to help give you confidence that you can navigate through that minefield! Who is responsible? Rev...

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Welcome to the gig economy

The world of work has changed, and we are starting to live in a gig economy in which temporary positions are common and workers are engaged for short periods or on a piecework basis, often under complex working arrangements. Such arrangements can benefit all parties. However, they are in contrast to the traditional job and employment con...

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So, what’s Phil done for you?

It's been a couple of weeks now since the Chancellor delivered his budget speech, confidently announcing an end to austerity and outlining the government’s spending plans for the coming year along with a range of supporting tax and other measures. Generally, the speech was well received although it has been pointed out that, should the...

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Using Contractors?

So, business is booming, and you need help to deal with the increased workload which has reached a critical mass. However, rather than take on more employees – you’re not quite ready for that yet –  you decide to outsource work to sub-contractors. Of course there are plenty of good reasons to go down this route. Greater flexibi...

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Half yearly round up – Employment Law

As ever there have been several employment law changes already this year with which to keep up to date. Below is a summary of the headline changes: Despite Brexit the EU directive General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) will come into force in May 2018. Whilst this may seem a long way off employers are being advised to review their...

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WCL’s new offices!

We are all delighted to report that we have moved into bigger offices to allow for further expansion of the company. Following a series of successful new hires, the time has come to finally take the plunge and we are looking forward to continued growth through 2017-18. WCL now has the capacity to provide a wider spectrum of accounting ...

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Dress Codes in the workplace

Dress codes in the workplace have recently hit the headlines. In December 2015 Nicola Thorp was sent home from her role as a receptionist with large accountancy firm PWC because she refused to wear heels which would have damaged her feet. As a result of her online petition, dress codes became the subject of consideration by two Parliament...

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Two new employment law decisions

Two interesting decisions have been recently reported, one relating to shared parental leave and the other to holiday pay: Shared Parental Leave The first case looking at shared parental leave has been determined by an employment tribunal in Scotland. This was the case of Snell v Network Rail. Mr Snell and his wife both worked for N...

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